Modern Times

Modern Times

DVD - 2010
Average Rating:
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When his boss demands more speed and efficiency, Chaplin goes crazy from his repetitious assembly line job. Primarily a silent film with music and sound effects, but occasional voices emanate from radios and television screens.
Publisher: [United States] : Criterion Collection, [2010]
Edition: Special ed
ISBN: 9781604653526
1604653523
Branch Call Number: 791.4372 M68c2
Characteristics: 2 videodiscs (87 min.) : sd., b&w ; 4 3/4 in

Opinion

From Library Staff

What it didn't get: 1936 Oscar for Best Actor (Charlie Chaplin)

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vookad Sep 23, 2010

Although it incorporates Chaplin's familiar gags it is a fascinating film. I am still "getting" it after a number of viewings. Until I read the description here I didn't realize it was only T.V.s, radios and other technology that spoke in the this part-silent movie. The scene with his b... Read More »


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Patrick_35
Jan 04, 2016

This is certainly one of Chaplin's best films and Chaplin is at his most inventive and balletic, especially during the factory scenes where he has a nervous breakdown. Chaplin was a perfectionist and thought nothing of spending years making a movie. He used his own money and had complete artistic freedom. During the making of City Lights he shut down production for 16 months while he figured out how to make the Tramp appear to be a rich man to the blind girl. And, much like Kubrick, he thought nothing of doing a hundred takes to get a scene right.

n
Nursebob
Dec 20, 2015

Presented in the silent film style using intertitles and only a few incidental sounds and mechanical voices, Charlie Chaplin’s comedy of manners for an industrial age is still relevant (and just as funny) eighty years later. Famous for its whimsically elaborate sets and physical comedy—including a now iconic image of Chaplin literally caught in the gears of an enormous engine—there is a gravity beneath the slapstick as issues of poverty, injustice, and the dehumanizing side of technology work their way in between the laughs. But it was a subtle scene of implied homosexuality plus a “gurgling stomach” passage that gave the Hays office nightmares. I guess they missed the part where he accidentally goes off on a hilarious cocaine binge! Classic cinema.

s
SmartAssAWhip
Apr 17, 2013

Unless you were born into affluence, anyone can relate to the struggles of "the 99%".
My personal favorite of Charlie Chaplin's storied career.
Even after over a half century,
this is still timeless.

c
c_anderson
Jan 04, 2011

This is an amazing film. Very, very funny, but it is also a social satire, and is poignant as well. It stands up very well after all these years.

vookad Sep 23, 2010

Although it incorporates Chaplin's familiar gags it is a fascinating film. I am still "getting" it after a number of viewings. Until I read the description here I didn't realize it was only T.V.s, radios and other technology that spoke in the this part-silent movie. The scene with his boss yelling at him from a giant screen in the employee bathroom speaks volumes about how we are monitored at work today. It's also a period piece in some ways; the depiction of life on the street and shanty towns (although there is only one shanty) makes this time come alive. One of the documentaries included points out that Chaplin's character doesn't "move up" in social status the way that Hollywood characters usually do. He starts as a tramp and ends as a tramp. Even if you have seen it before, have another look. There is a lot of depth here.

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